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Regent Theatre Presents The Jazz Loft According to W. Eugene Smith

 

THE JAZZ LOFT According to W. Eugene Smith” Boston Film Premiere, Monday, April 24th at 7:30pm at Regent Theatre

The Regent Underground Theatre… “The Biggest Names in Jazz Came to Jam. One Photographer Captured It All”

“The purpose of all art is to cause a deep and emotion, also one that is entertaining or pleasing. Out of the depth and entertainment comes value.” – W. Eugene Smith

WNYC STUDIOS Presents, In Association with Lumiere Productions- THE JAZZ LOFT ACCORDING TO W. EUGENE SMITH. Written, Produced, and Directed by Sara Fishko

Screening at the Regent Theatre in Arlington, MA on Monday, April 24; Sponsored by JazzBoston in conjunction with JazzWeek 2017The Regent Theatre, 7 Medford Street, Arlington, MA 02474

A JazzBoston thank you Fred Taylor event in recognition of his unsurpassed contribution and dedication to Greater Boston’s Jazz scene, including numerous collaborations with the Regent Theatre. WNYC STUDIOS Presents In Association with Lumiere Productions THE JAZZ LOFT ACCORDING TO W. EUGENE SMITH Written, Produced, and Directed by Sara Fishko Between 1957 and 1965 in New York, dozens of jazz musicians jam night after night in a dilapidated Sixth Avenue loft, not realizing that much of what they play and say to each other is being captured on audio tape and in still pictures by the gentle and unstable genius, former LIFE Magazine photographer W. Eugene Smith, who lives in the loft space next door. Meanwhile, Thelonious Monk stops by for three weeks of rehearsals; drummer Ronnie Free gets hooked on hard drugs, having been turned on by a drummer who was his boyhood idol years before; loft-resident Hall Overton, Juilliard instructor and classical composer, becomes a jazz guru; the 50s give way to the 60s; Smith begins to record his own phone calls and visits from the local police; the world changes—and Smith gets evicted.

W. Eugene Smith, [Bob Brookmeyer, Bill Crow, Jim Hall, and Bill Potts], 1957-1965. © 2009, 2015 The Heirs of W. Eugene Smith.

Read the article, A Hidden New York City Jazz Scene, through the Eyes of a Master, by Dan Abbe on American Photo Magazine, or listen to all ten episodes of The Jazz Loft Radio Series on WNYC.

Photographs by W. Eugene Smith, collection Center for Creative Photography. The University of Arizona. © The Heirs of W. Eugene Smith.

The New York Times “Review: ‘The Jazz Loft According to W. Eugene Smith'”
TIME, “The Biggest Names in Jazz Came to Jam. One Photographer Captured It All”
The Leonard Lopate Show, “The Lazz Legends Next Door”
The Leonard Lopate Show, “The Jazz Loft, A WNYC Studio Original”
Newsweek, “A Photojournalist’s Most Prolific Period, Set to Jazz”
Indiewire, “Women Directors: Meet Sara Fishko”
The Hollywood Reporter, “DOC NYC Review”
Bedford and Bowery, “The Jazz Loft Will Bop You and Floor You”
American Photo, “W. Eugene Smith’s Time in the Jazz Loft”

WNYC STUDIOS Presents In Association with Lumiere Productions. THE JAZZ LOFT ACCORDING TO W. EUGENE SMITH was Written, Produced, and Directed by Sara Fishko.

W. Eugene Smith, [Self-portrait at loft window]. © 2009, 2015 The Heirs of W. Eugene Smith.

Between 1957 and 1965 in New York, dozens of jazz musicians jam night after night in a dilapidated Sixth Avenue loft, not realizing that much of what they play and say to each other is being captured on audio tape and in still pictures by the gentle and unstable genius, former LIFE Magazine photographer W. Eugene Smith, who lives in the loft space next door.

Meanwhile, Thelonious Monk stops by for three weeks of rehearsals; drummer Ronnie Free gets hooked on hard drugs, having been turned on by a drummer who was his boyhood idol years before; loft-resident Hall Overton, Juilliard instructor and classical composer, becomes a jazz guru;the 50s give way to the 60s; Smith begins to record his own phone calls and visits from the local police; the world changes—and Smith gets evicted.

Photographer W. Eugene Smith recorded 4000 hours of audio tape and took 40,000 photographs in the Jazz Loft between 1957 and 1965. Ours is the first film to make use of this archive, now housed at the Center For Creative Photography at the University of Arizona.

“The year before he died, Smith wrote: ‘I think I was at my very peak as a photographer in 1958 or so. My imagination and my seeing were both … red hot … Everywhere I looked, every time I thought, it seemed it left me with great exuberance and just a truer quality of seeing. But it was one of the most miserable times of my life, for I had little time to put it into real usage.’ At last, a half-century on, someone has found the time. Through Stephenson’s diligence and focus, Smith’s exuberant way of seeing has at long last been illuminated.” – Sean O’Hagan, Mingus, Monk and Mailer: W Eugene Smith’s Jazz Loft photographs, The Guardian

The Walk to Paradise Garden © W. Eugene Smith

 

“Up to and including the moment of exposure, the photographer is working in an undeniably subjective way. By his choice of technical approach, by the selection of the subject matter…and by his decision as to the exact cinematic instant of exposure, he is blending the variables of interpretation into an emotional whole.” – W. Eugene Smith

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